NAEB Text Search


Note: This Boolean text search is experimental and only Boolean operators "AND" and "OR" are supported. Additionally, only the first Boolean operator in the query is used - any additional operators are treated as part of the text query.

382 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records.
Abronia fragrans Nutt. ex Hook.
Snowball Sand Verbena
USDA ABFR2
Keres, Western Other, Ceremonial Items
Flowers made into ceremonial necklaces.
Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 24
Abutilon incanum (Link) Sweet
Pelotazo
USDA ABIN
Hawaiian Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid
Flowers, root bark and other plants pounded, resulting liquid heated and taken for stomachaches.
Akana, Akaiko, 1922, Hawaiian Herbs of Medicinal Value, Honolulu: Pacific Book House, page 69
Achillea millefolium L.
Common Yarrow
USDA ACMIM2
Potawatomi Drug, Stimulant
Flowers smudged on live coals to revive comatose patient.
Smith, Huron H., 1933, Ethnobotany of the Forest Potawatomi Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 7:1-230, page 47, 48
Achillea millefolium L.
Common Yarrow
USDA ACMIM2
Potawatomi Drug, Witchcraft Medicine
Flowers smudged on live coals to repel evil spirits.
Smith, Huron H., 1933, Ethnobotany of the Forest Potawatomi Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 7:1-230, page 47, 48
Achillea millefolium var. occidentalis DC.
Western Yarrow
USDA ACMIO
Cree, Woodlands Drug, Pediatric Aid
Flowers & wild mint flowers wrapped in a cloth, dipped in water & used to remove teething gum pus.
Leighton, Anna L., 1985, Wild Plant Use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of East-Central Saskatchewan, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series, page 22
Achillea millefolium var. occidentalis DC.
Western Yarrow
USDA ACMIO
Cree, Woodlands Drug, Toothache Remedy
Flowers & wild mint flowers wrapped in a cloth, dipped in water & used to remove teething gum pus.
Leighton, Anna L., 1985, Wild Plant Use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of East-Central Saskatchewan, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series, page 22
Achillea millefolium var. occidentalis DC.
Western Yarrow
USDA ACMIO
Ojibwa Other, Ceremonial Items
Flower heads used in the kinnikinnick mixture smoked in medicine lodge ceremonies.
Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, page 417
Achillea millefolium var. occidentalis DC.
Western Yarrow
USDA ACMIO
Ojibwa Other, Smoke Plant
Flower heads used in the kinnikinnick mixture smoked in medicine lodge ceremonies.
Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, page 417
Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze
Blue Giant Hyssop
USDA AGFO
Cree Drug, Ceremonial Medicine
Flowers frequently included in medicine bundles.
Johnston, Alex, 1987, Plants and the Blackfoot, Lethbridge, Alberta. Lethbridge Historical Society, page 51
Agave americana L.
American Century Plant
USDA AGAMA2
Papago Food, Vegetable
Flower stalks eaten as greens.
Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill, 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3):1-84, page 16
Agave americana L.
American Century Plant
USDA AGAMA2
Papago Food, Vegetable
Flower stalks roasted in ashes and eaten as greens.
Castetter, Edward F. and Ruth M. Underhill, 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest II. The Ethnobiology of the Papago Indians, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(3):1-84, page 46
Agave deserti Engelm.
Desert Agave
USDA AGDED
Cahuilla Food, Dried Food
Flowers parboiled to release the bitterness and dried for future use.
Bean, Lowell John and Katherine Siva Saubel, 1972, Temalpakh (From the Earth); Cahuilla Indian Knowledge and Usage of Plants, Banning, CA. Malki Museum Press, page 31
Agave deserti Engelm.
Desert Agave
USDA AGDED
Cahuilla Food, Unspecified
Flowers parboiled to release the bitterness and eaten.
Bean, Lowell John and Katherine Siva Saubel, 1972, Temalpakh (From the Earth); Cahuilla Indian Knowledge and Usage of Plants, Banning, CA. Malki Museum Press, page 31
Agave palmeri Engelm.
Palmer's Century Plant
USDA AGPA3
Apache, Western Food, Beverage
Flower stalk baked and chewed for juice.
Buskirk, Winfred, 1986, The Western Apache: Living With the Land Before 1950, Norman. University of Oklahoma Press, page 169
Agave parryi Engelm.
Parry's Agave
USDA AGPAP5
Apache, Western Food, Beverage
Flower stalk baked and chewed for juice.
Buskirk, Winfred, 1986, The Western Apache: Living With the Land Before 1950, Norman. University of Oklahoma Press, page 169
Agave parryi Engelm.
Parry's Agave
USDA AGPAP5
Apache, Western Food, Beverage
Flower stalk baked and chewed for juice.
Buskirk, Winfred, 1986, The Western Apache: Living With the Land Before 1950, Norman. University of Oklahoma Press, page 169
Agave sp.
Mescal
Yavapai Food, Unspecified
Flower stalk baked and soft, inner part used for food.
Gifford, E. W., 1936, Northeastern and Western Yavapai, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 34:247-345, page 259
Aleurites moluccana (L.) Willd.
Indian Walnut
USDA ALMO2
Hawaiian Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid
Flowers & other plants pounded & resulting liquid given to infants for stomach or bowel disorders.
Akana, Akaiko, 1922, Hawaiian Herbs of Medicinal Value, Honolulu: Pacific Book House, page 56
Aleurites moluccana (L.) Willd.
Indian Walnut
USDA ALMO2
Hawaiian Drug, Pediatric Aid
Flowers & other plants pounded & resulting liquid given to infants for stomach or bowel disorders.
Akana, Akaiko, 1922, Hawaiian Herbs of Medicinal Value, Honolulu: Pacific Book House, page 56
Amaranthus cruentus L.
Red Amaranth
USDA AMCR4
Apache, White Mountain Other, Paint
Flowers used as face paint.
Reagan, Albert B., 1929, Plants Used by the White Mountain Apache Indians of Arizona, Wisconsin Archeologist 8:143-61., page 155
Amaranthus cruentus L.
Red Amaranth
USDA AMCR4
Hopi Dye, Red
Flowers used to color bread red for certain dances.
Vestal, Paul A, 1940, Notes on a Collection of Plants from the Hopi Indian Region of Arizona Made by J. G. Owens in 1891, Botanical Museum Leaflets (Harvard University) 8(8):153-168, page 162
Amaranthus cruentus L.
Red Amaranth
USDA AMCR4
Hopi Dye, Red
Flowers used to color bread red for certain dances.
Vestal, Paul A, 1940, Notes on a Collection of Plants from the Hopi Indian Region of Arizona Made by J. G. Owens in 1891, Botanical Museum Leaflets (Harvard University) 8(8):153-168, page 162
Amaranthus cruentus L.
Red Amaranth
USDA AMCR4
Hopi Dye, Unspecified
Flowers used to color piki.
Colton, Harold S., 1974, Hopi History And Ethnobotany, IN D. A. Horr (ed.) Hopi Indians. Garland: New York., page 283
Anaphalis margaritacea (L.) Benth.
Western Pearlyeverlasting
USDA ANMA
Anticosti Food, Beverage
Flowers used to scent alcohol.
Rousseau, Jacques, 1946, Notes Sur L'ethnobotanique D'anticosti, Archives de Folklore 1:60-71, page 68
Anaphalis margaritacea (L.) Benth.
Western Pearlyeverlasting
USDA ANMA
Mahuna Drug, Dermatological Aid
Flowers used for skin ulcers and foot sores.
Romero, John Bruno, 1954, The Botanical Lore of the California Indians, New York. Vantage Press, Inc., page 11
Anaphalis margaritacea (L.) Benth.
Western Pearlyeverlasting
USDA ANMA
Potawatomi Drug, Witchcraft Medicine
Flowers smoked in a pipe or smudged on coals to repel evil spirits.
Smith, Huron H., 1933, Ethnobotany of the Forest Potawatomi Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 7:1-230, page 49
Aquilegia eximia Van Houtte ex Planch.
Van Houtte's Columbine
USDA AQEX
Pomo, Kashaya Other, Ceremonial Items
Flowers used in dance wreathes at the Strawberry Festival.
Goodrich, Jennie and Claudia Lawson, 1980, Kashaya Pomo Plants, Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, page 39
Aquilegia formosa Fisch. ex DC.
Western Columbine
USDA AQFO
Hanaksiala Food, Candy
Flowers sucked by children for the sweet nectar.
Compton, Brian Douglas, 1993, Upper North Wakashan and Southern Tsimshian Ethnobotany: The Knowledge and Usage of Plants..., Ph.D. Dissertation, University of British Columbia, page 262
Aquilegia formosa Fisch. ex DC.
Western Columbine
USDA AQFO
Okanagan-Colville Other, Good Luck Charm
Flower used as a good luck charm.
Turner, Nancy J., R. Bouchard and Dorothy I.D. Kennedy, 1980, Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington, Victoria. British Columbia Provincial Museum, page 117
Aquilegia formosa Fisch. ex DC.
Western Columbine
USDA AQFO
Thompson Food, Forage
Flowers used as sources of nectar by humming birds.
Steedman, E.V., 1928, The Ethnobotany of the Thompson Indians of British Columbia, SI-BAE Annual Report #45:441-522, page 516
Arbutus menziesii Pursh
Pacific Madrone
USDA ARME
Pomo, Kashaya Drug, Love Medicine
Flowers used for love charm poisoning.
Goodrich, Jennie and Claudia Lawson, 1980, Kashaya Pomo Plants, Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, page 67
Asclepias fascicularis Dcne.
Mexican Whorled Milkweed
USDA ASFA
Mendocino Indian Drug, Poison
Flowers considered poisonous.
Chestnut, V. K., 1902, Plants Used by the Indians of Mendocino County, California, Contributions from the U.S. National Herbarium 7:295-408., page 380
Asclepias speciosa Torr.
Showy Milkweed
USDA ASSP
Cheyenne Food, Sauce & Relish
Flowers boiled with soup or meat, flour added and eaten as a gravy.
Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 66
Asclepias speciosa Torr.
Showy Milkweed
USDA ASSP
Crow Food, Sauce & Relish
Flowers boiled with soup or meat, flour added and eaten as a gravy.
Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 66
Asclepias speciosa Torr.
Showy Milkweed
USDA ASSP
Crow Food, Unspecified
Flowers boiled for food.
Blankinship, J. W., 1905, Native Economic Plants of Montana, Bozeman. Montana Agricultural College Experimental Station, Bulletin 56, page 7
Asclepias syriaca L.
Common Milkweed
USDA ASSY
Chippewa Food, Preserves
Flowers cut up, stewed and eaten like preserves.
Densmore, Frances, 1928, Uses of Plants by the Chippewa Indians, SI-BAE Annual Report #44:273-379, page 320
Asclepias syriaca L.
Common Milkweed
USDA ASSY
Potawatomi Food, Soup
Flowers and buds used to thicken meat soups and to impart a very pleasing flavor to the dish.
Smith, Huron H., 1933, Ethnobotany of the Forest Potawatomi Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 7:1-230, page 96
Aster sp.
Prairie Aster
Blackfoot Dye, Unspecified
Flowers rubbed by children on bouncing arrows for color.
Hellson, John C., 1974, Ethnobotany of the Blackfoot Indians, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series, page 109
Aster sp.
Prairie Aster
Blackfoot Other, Jewelry
Flowers used to make necklaces.
Hellson, John C., 1974, Ethnobotany of the Blackfoot Indians, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series, page 109
Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.
Fourwing Saltbush
USDA ATCAC
Navajo Food, Pie & Pudding
Flowers used to make puddings.
Hocking, George M., 1956, Some Plant Materials Used Medicinally and Otherwise by the Navaho Indians in the Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, El Palacio 56:146-165, page 148
Balsamorhiza sagittata (Pursh) Nutt.
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
USDA BASA3
Okanagan-Colville Food, Unspecified
Flower bud stems peeled and succulent inner portion eaten raw or boiled.
Turner, Nancy J., R. Bouchard and Dorothy I.D. Kennedy, 1980, Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington, Victoria. British Columbia Provincial Museum, page 80
Berlandiera lyrata Benth.
Lyreleaf Greeneyes
USDA BELY
Acoma Food, Spice
Flowers mixed with sausage as seasoning.
Castetter, Edward F., 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest I. Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(1):1-44, page 19
Berlandiera lyrata Benth.
Lyreleaf Greeneyes
USDA BELY
Keres, Western Food, Spice
Flowers mixed with sausage as seasoning.
Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 33
Berlandiera lyrata Benth.
Lyreleaf Greeneyes
USDA BELY
Laguna Food, Spice
Flowers mixed with sausage as seasoning.
Castetter, Edward F., 1935, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest I. Uncultivated Native Plants Used as Sources of Food, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4(1):1-44, page 19
Betula occidentalis Hook.
Water Birch
USDA BEOC2
Blackfoot Drug, Abortifacient
Flowers and leaves included in two separate bundles and used to stop conception.
Hellson, John C., 1974, Ethnobotany of the Blackfoot Indians, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series, page 60
Bidens sp.
Kookoolau
Hawaiian Drug, Pediatric Aid
Flowers and buds chewed by mothers and given to infants for general debility.
Akana, Akaiko, 1922, Hawaiian Herbs of Medicinal Value, Honolulu: Pacific Book House, page 53
Bidens sp.
Kookoolau
Hawaiian Drug, Strengthener
Flowers and buds chewed by mothers and given to infants for general debility.
Akana, Akaiko, 1922, Hawaiian Herbs of Medicinal Value, Honolulu: Pacific Book House, page 53
Boykinia occidentalis Torr. & Gray
Coastal Brookfoam
USDA BOOC2
Makah Other, Decorations
Flowers used in bouquets.
Gill, Steven J., 1983, Ethnobotany of the Makah and Ozette People, Olympic Peninsula, Washington (USA), Washington State University, Ph.D. Thesis, page 257
Brassica sp.
Mustard
Pomo, Kashaya Food, Unspecified
Flowers eaten raw or cooked and young leaves eaten boiled and fried.
Goodrich, Jennie and Claudia Lawson, 1980, Kashaya Pomo Plants, Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, page 76
Butomus umbellatus L.
Flowering Rush
USDA BUUM
Iroquois Drug, Veterinary Aid
Decoction of whole plant and bark from another plant added to cow and horse feed for worms.
Rousseau, Jacques, 1945, Le Folklore Botanique De Caughnawaga, Contributions de l'Institut botanique l'Universite de Montreal 55:7-72, page 66